Once upon a time, Michigan had a governor whose name was Jennifer. President Joe Biden, however, made the mistake of calling our current governor Gretchen Whitmer, 'Jenifer' as he met with governors across the country on a video conference call.

Jennifer Granholm served as governor of the state of Michigan from 2003 until 2010. But that was more than 10 years ago.

Like Governor Whitmer, Granholm was a Democrat. She currently serves as the US Secretary of Energy.

But hey, it's an easy mistake to make. Have you ever been addressing one of your children when you run down your list of kids before you land on the correct name? I'm guilty, and Joe's got a couple of decades on me.

Scroll down for the video below, the president's gaffe comes at the very end of the six-minute clip.

Don't Overlook the Flint Reference

If you skip to the end of the video just to see the president's goof, you're missing half the fun. Jennifer, er uh, Gretchen Whitmer makes a Flint reference that you won't want to miss.

"Fix the damn roads" has been a talking point and campaign slogan for Whitmer since she began her bid for governor in 2018. The phrase has morphed into "fix the dams and roads" since the collapse of two dams in Central Michigan last year.

But where did "fix the damn roads" originate?

Whitmer notes that other governors and cabinet secretaries have borrowed that line because Michigan is certainly not the only state dealing with crumbling infrastructure. But Whitmer goes on to give credit where credit is due.

"Anyone can use that phrase," the governor says. "But just make sure that the mom in Flint who first said that to me back in 2018 gets a little bit of credit."

Did you know that the phrase "Fix the damn roads" originated in Flint?

 

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